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Canada needs a green and just recovery

August 18, 2020

The federal government is preparing to give the Canadian economy a multi-billion-dollar kick-start in an effort to recover from the COVID-19 health crisis. This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to invest in a Green Recovery – a sustainable stimulus package focused on increasing employment and helping Canada transition to a cleaner and more equitable economy.

But some of Canada’s biggest polluters, like oil, gas and petrochemical companies, are pushing hard for the federal government to funnel recovery spending into their pockets instead. In the last few months, the oil and gas lobby has had more meetings with government officials than any other industry.

Oil, gas and petrochemical companies are powerful, and they will try everything they can to dominate recovery spending. But the COVID-19 crisis has taught us a valuable lesson – when we act together, we can overcome even the largest of obstacles.

This is urgent. Tell the federal government that you do not want billions and billions of dollars handed over to big polluters that will compromise our environment and accelerate climate change.

Instead, demand that they invest in a Green Recovery – one that will shift Canada towards a stronger, more equitable, and more sustainable society.

[UPDATE]

On Sept. 23rd, the federal government’s Speech from the Throne included several commitments that could contribute to a green and just recovery – including new jobs retrofitting homes and buildings to be more energy-efficient, investments to make communities more resilient to climate impacts, training programs to support workers and businesses in a clean energy transition, and promised legislation to implement the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

These are positive commitments, but we need to see them backed up with real investments and legislation. Send a letter below to ensure that a green and just recovery remains a top priority for decision-makers this fall!

 
Author: 
West Coast Environmental Law